Posts tagged ‘Worship’

November 5, 2015

B.B. Warfield Memorial Lecture Series (Anthology CD)

Warfield Lectures CDStatus: Available

CD Description

Throughout the history of the Church, the great doctrines of the faith were forged in the fires of debate as in Pelagius & Augustine, Luther & Erasmus, Calvin & Eck, and Whitefield & Wesley. The goal of this debate and lecture series is to promote the exchange and examination of the great historic doctrines of the Church; foster a corporate sense of the relevance of the Christian faith and Reformed theology to our culture; and challenge the individual believer to connect with the historic Christian faith and the Church.

Messages from the B.B. Warfield Memorial Lecture series feature the following topics:

Pentecost and the Work of the Holy Spirit Today by Richard Gaffin
Spurgeon, Lloyd-Jones, and Edwards by Iain Murray
Revival and Revivalism by Iain Murray
A Biblical Theology of Worship by Daniel Block
Unsought Gifts: Christian Suffering by Mark Talbot
Will the Church go through the End-Time Tribulation? by Gregory Beale
John Calvin and the Protestant Reformation by Carl Trueman
The Christian, His Witness, and Defending the Faith by Scott Oliphint

33 MP3 messages on 1 CD

CD Details:

SKU: M-BBWA
Publisher: Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals
Publish Date: 2015
33 MP3 messages on 1 CDs

Source: Reformed Resources

Library patrons who listen to this CD are invited to share their comments, reviews, questions or criticisms for discussion in the comments below this post.

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July 21, 2015

Consecration of the Priests and the Altar (Exodus 29)

Chuck CainOn Sunday, July 19, 2015, the Adult Sunday School Lesson completed a review of Exodus 29 regarding consecration of the priests and the altar.

Three animal sacrifices are identified as part of the ceremony. In each case the blood of the animal is applied in various ways to the altar.

The first sacrifice is a bull for the sin offering. Curtain organs are burned on the altar. The remainder is burned outside the camp. Hebrews 13:11-12 identifies this practice as a foreshadowing of Jesus being crucified outside the city as a sacrifice for our sin.

The second sacrifice is a ram for the burnt offering. This offering represented full commitment of the priests and the people.

The third sacrifice is a ram for the fellowship offering. This offering is also identified elsewhere as a peace offering or wave offering. In this case after specified organs are burned on the altar, the breast and thigh are eaten by the priests symbolizing a fellowship meal between them (and the people) and God.

The order of these three offerings differs in Leviticus as identified by J. A. Motyer. In Exodus 29 the order highlights individual need for being forgiven. In Leviticus 1-5 the order is burnt offering (1:3), fellowship offering (3:1), and sin offering (4:2-3) highlighting the order of divine desire. In Leviticus 6-7 the order is burnt offering (6:9), sin offering (6:25), and fellowship offering (7:11) highlighting the order of priestly ministry.

Exodus 29 states that the consecration ceremony for the priests was to last seven days.
The chapter closes with the highly important and oft repeated statement, “I will dwell among the people of Israel and will be their God. And they shall know that I am the LORD their God, who brought them out of the land of Egypt that I might dwell among them. I am the LORD their God.”

Listen to “Consecration of the Priests and the Altar” (Exodus 29) at mcopc.org.

June 30, 2015

The Structure of the Tabernacle (Exodus 26)

Chuck CainOn June 28, 2015, the Adult Sunday School Class reviewed Exodus 26, which describes the structure of the tabernacle.

The chapter begins by the LORD telling Moses how the tabernacle curtains were to be designed. The ceiling and walls were to be covered by linen curtains made with colored yarn and cherubim designs. A priest entering the tabernacle would see cherubim depictions on all the walls and the ceiling as a portrayal of heaven. This curtain would then be covered by three more curtains of goats’ hair, rams’ skins, and porpoise skins.

Then the upright frames were described which were to form the north, south, and west walls. The frames were to be made of acacia wood and overlaid with gold. The frames would be 15 feet tall and number 20 for each of the north and south walls making a total length of 45 feet for the tabernacle. A total of 8 frames would comprise the west end. The inside width of the tabernacle would be 15 feet.

Each frame would rest on two silver bases each made from a talent of silver (38:27). The 4 pillars for the veil would each rest on a single silver base. Thus, the 48 frames and 4 pillars would require 100 silver bases, each weighing one talent or 75 pounds (7,500 pounds total).

The chapter also describes the design of the veil and the entrance screen.

Chapters 2540 of Exodus emphasizes the importance and the exactness of required worship. The materials used for tabernacle construction emphasize God’s holiness, glory, and beauty.—Chuck Cain

Listen to The Structure of the Tabernacle (Exodus 26) at mcopc.org.

June 19, 2015

With Reverence and Awe: Returning to the Basics of Reformed Worship

With Reverence and Awe CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

Hart and Muether have produced a refreshing and informative primer on Reformed worship. Concerned with the integrity of Reformed worship in these days of the so-called “worship wars,” the authors argue for a traditional Reformed approach they see as biblically and confessionally faithful. Simply put, worship must not be disconnected from its theological foundation. Responding to the trend of less formal, relaxed, and more user-friendly worship formats, the authors remind us that Christian public worship ought to reflect the antithesis between the church and the world. While worship should be intelligible, it should not be confused with evangelistic outreach and therefore ought not to lose its “alien” nature and heavenly focus. Hart and Muether discuss two key Reformed principles of worship, the “regulative” and the “dialogical.” While you might not agree with everything the authors say, you will wrestle with essential issues of Reformed worship. – Jeff Waddington – Westminster Bookstore Staff

Source: WTS Books

About the Author

John Muether

Reformed Theological Seminary Faculty Page

John R. Muether (MAR, Westminster Theological Seminary) is librarian and associate professor of church history at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando. The coauthor of four volumes, Muether has served on the Harvard Divinity School library staff and has been librarian at Western Theological Seminary and Westminster Theological Seminary. He has served on the editorial board of Regeneration Quarterly and on the board of directors of Mars Hill Audio. He is historian of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and serves on that denomination’s Christian Education Committee.

darryl g hart

The Philadelphia Society

D. G. Hart studied American history at the Johns Hopkins University and has served as director of the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College and academic dean and professor of church history at Westminster Seminary in California. He is currently visiting assistant professor of history at Hillsdale College.

Source: P&R Publishing

Library patrons who have read this book are invited to share their comments, reviews, questions or criticisms for discussion in the comments below this post.

March 25, 2015

The Church (Contours of Christian Theology)

The Church Cover
Status
: Checked Out

Publisher’s Description

At a time in which the very word church sounds a tone of dull irrelevance, the doctrine of the church has suffered the studied neglect of many Christian leaders. The persistent demands to market, manage and grow the church and to meet the felt needs of churched and unchurched all threaten to quench theological reflection on the abiding nature and mission of the church. But few activities bear greater promise as a starting point for renewing and reshaping the Christian church than the work of theology.

In this book Edmund Clowney takes up that task, addressing along the way a variety of contemporary concerns: worship, mission, church and culture, church and state, church order and discipline, the ministry of women, baptism and the Lord’s Supper, tongues and prophecy, signs and wonders. He draws on decades of thinking and teaching about the church as well as from his committed leadership and ministry within the church. Biblical, historical, systematic and Reformed, The Church is a timely and provocative reflection on the life, order and purpose of the household of God.

About the Author

Edmund P. Clowney (1917-2005) was a professor of practical theology and former president of Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He is the author of The Message of 1 Peter in The Bible Speaks today series.

Book Details

336 Pages

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

Publication Date: October 1995

ISBN 10: 0830815341

ISBN 13: 9780830815340

(HT: WTS Books)

March 23, 2015

Announcements for Week of March 22, 2015

Robert Mossotti, OPC Licentiate

Robert Mossotti, OPC Licentiate

The following are the announcements for the week of March 22-28, 2015:

Our next North Tarrant County Galatians Bible Study will be this Tuesday, March 24, from 7-8PM. The study will be taught by OPC Licentiate, Robert Mossotti (subscribe to Robert’s SermonAudio podcast). Call the church for location (phone number below map in sidebar).

Next Sunday evening, March 29, we will host the DFW-Area Combined Worship Service.

The March Library Spotlight is James Bannerman’s The Church of Christ. “In the last one hundred and fifty years no other Westmisnter Calvinist has defended and exposited Presbyterian church polity like him, and the Church of Christ remains unparalleled, especially for its elucidation of church power.”–Rev. Dr. A. Craig Troxel, pastor of Bethel OPC, Wheaton, IL.

March 21, 2015

The Christian Life: A Doctrinal Introduction

Christian Life Doctrinal Intro CoverStatus: Available

Publisher’s Description

Christian doctrine matters for Christian living. This is one of the most important growth points of the Christian life, writes Sinclair B. Ferguson. From this starting point, The Christian Life expounds such key biblical themes as grace, faith, repentance, new birth and assurance with clarity and contagious enthusiasm. Christian doctrines are life-shaping, explains the author, because they show us the God we worship.

Widely used and appreciated since its first appearance, The Christian Life not only expounds the teaching of Scripture, but outlines its meaning for practical Christian living. It is, as J. I. Packer writes in his preface, theology that is practical, applying Bible teaching with insight and wisdom to the condition of plain people. Christian beginners will get the benefit and the Lord’s older sheep, grown tough and stringy maybe, will find themselves edified and perhaps tenderized too.

Sinclair FergusonAbout the Author

Dr. Sinclair B. Ferguson is senior minister of the historic First Presbyterian Church in Columbia, S.C., and a distinguished visiting professor of systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Dallas, Texas. He has been an editor and a trustee with the Banner of Truth Trust publishing house and has been a prolific author. His published titles include The Holy Spirit, Grow in Grace, Let’s Study Philippians, John Owen on the Christian Life, and, for children, The Big Book of Questions and Answers and The Big Book of Questions & Answers About Jesus. Dr. Ferguson and his wife, Dorothy, have been married for thirty-six years. They have four children.

Book Details

201 Pages

Publisher: Banner of Truth

Publication Date: in 1981

ISBN 10: 0851515169

ISBN 13: 9780851515168