Posts tagged ‘Sunday School’

June 30, 2015

The Structure of the Tabernacle (Exodus 26)

Chuck CainOn June 28, 2015, the Adult Sunday School Class reviewed Exodus 26, which describes the structure of the tabernacle.

The chapter begins by the LORD telling Moses how the tabernacle curtains were to be designed. The ceiling and walls were to be covered by linen curtains made with colored yarn and cherubim designs. A priest entering the tabernacle would see cherubim depictions on all the walls and the ceiling as a portrayal of heaven. This curtain would then be covered by three more curtains of goats’ hair, rams’ skins, and porpoise skins.

Then the upright frames were described which were to form the north, south, and west walls. The frames were to be made of acacia wood and overlaid with gold. The frames would be 15 feet tall and number 20 for each of the north and south walls making a total length of 45 feet for the tabernacle. A total of 8 frames would comprise the west end. The inside width of the tabernacle would be 15 feet.

Each frame would rest on two silver bases each made from a talent of silver (38:27). The 4 pillars for the veil would each rest on a single silver base. Thus, the 48 frames and 4 pillars would require 100 silver bases, each weighing one talent or 75 pounds (7,500 pounds total).

The chapter also describes the design of the veil and the entrance screen.

Chapters 2540 of Exodus emphasizes the importance and the exactness of required worship. The materials used for tabernacle construction emphasize God’s holiness, glory, and beauty.—Chuck Cain

Listen to The Structure of the Tabernacle (Exodus 26) at mcopc.org.

April 14, 2015

Characteristics of the Ten Commandments, part 1 (Exodus 20)

Chuck CainOn Sunday, April 12, 2015 the adult Sunday School lesson focused on Exodus 20 and various characteristics of the Ten Commandments. Five of twelve topics were covered this week.

First, various preliminary items were covered such as the term “Decalogue” or “ten words.”

Second, the preamble and historical prologue in verse 2 was reviewed. This led to the third topic comprising the question as to whether Israel’s deliverance from bondage in Egypt was replaced by a new bondage under the law. But the law brought not a new bondage but a new freedom, the “law of liberty” (James 1:25). Several examples of this new freedom were provided. In particular, the liberation of negative commands was described as a fourth topic. One particular example highlighted was the command to Adam and Eve not to eat of the one tree. This “shall not” command included the freedom to eat of all other trees. If the command had been to eat only of one tree it would have been much more restrictive.

Finally, a discussion proceeded regarding the fact that laws always reflect the character of the lawgiver. Each of the Ten Commandments were discussed along with how each reflects certain attributes of God. — Chuck Cain

Listen to “Characteristics of the Ten Commandments, part 1″ (Exodus 20) at mcopc.org.

March 23, 2015

Amalekites Concluded (Exodus 17:8-16), Jethro Advises Moses (Exodus 18:1-27)

Chuck CainOn March 22, 2015, Chuck Cain taught the Adult Sunday School class on the Israelites’ battle with the Amalekites in Exodus 17:8-16. Joshua’s military success due to dependence on the Lord as Aaron and Hur assisted Moses in holding up the staff of God during the fight (Exodus 17:9-13), concluding with Yahweh’s stated intention to one day judge Amalekites for opposing Israel in the wilderness (Exodus 17:14-16). Later, King Saul’s line would lose the kingship of Israel for disobeying the Lord’s command to utterly destroy Amalek (1 Samuel 15:1-35).

Then, in Exodus 18, we learn of Jethro, Moses’ Midianite father-in-law who brings Moses’ wife and children to him (Exodus 18:1-7). Moses declares Yahweh’s deliverance of Israel from the Egyptians to Jethro, who rejoices and offers sacrifice in response, acknowledging Yahweh as greater than all gods, providing a good picture of evangelism (Exodus 18:8-12). Finally, Jethro advises Moses to delegate his judicial responsibilities to others who judge smaller matters among the people, reserving the more difficult issues for Moses, and together they advised the Israelites by the Law of God, and so they were able to endure such a tremendous task under the guidance of God (Exodus 18:13-27). Listen here.

March 16, 2015

Introduction to the Amalekites

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This week’s Study in Exodus with Chuck Cain

Promotes the March 2015 issue of New Horizons in the OPC magazine on the Christian and the Arts. 

Discusses Pi Day and answers a question about biblical numerology.
Introduction to Amalekites as representing the enemies of the LORD and his people as background to understanding the Israelites’ conflict with them in Exodus 17:6-16.
Listen here.