Archive for ‘Worship’

November 5, 2015

B.B. Warfield Memorial Lecture Series (Anthology CD)

Warfield Lectures CDStatus: Available

CD Description

Throughout the history of the Church, the great doctrines of the faith were forged in the fires of debate as in Pelagius & Augustine, Luther & Erasmus, Calvin & Eck, and Whitefield & Wesley. The goal of this debate and lecture series is to promote the exchange and examination of the great historic doctrines of the Church; foster a corporate sense of the relevance of the Christian faith and Reformed theology to our culture; and challenge the individual believer to connect with the historic Christian faith and the Church.

Messages from the B.B. Warfield Memorial Lecture series feature the following topics:

Pentecost and the Work of the Holy Spirit Today by Richard Gaffin
Spurgeon, Lloyd-Jones, and Edwards by Iain Murray
Revival and Revivalism by Iain Murray
A Biblical Theology of Worship by Daniel Block
Unsought Gifts: Christian Suffering by Mark Talbot
Will the Church go through the End-Time Tribulation? by Gregory Beale
John Calvin and the Protestant Reformation by Carl Trueman
The Christian, His Witness, and Defending the Faith by Scott Oliphint

33 MP3 messages on 1 CD

CD Details:

SKU: M-BBWA
Publisher: Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals
Publish Date: 2015
33 MP3 messages on 1 CDs

Source: Reformed Resources

Library patrons who listen to this CD are invited to share their comments, reviews, questions or criticisms for discussion in the comments below this post.

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September 7, 2015

Sabbath Commands and the Golden Calf (Exodus 31:12-32:6)

Chuck CainOn August 16, 2015, the adult Sunday School class reviewed Exodus 31:12 through 32:6.

In the last section of Exodus 31 the LORD gives Moses further commands regarding the Sabbath. The LORD had provided commandments regarding the Sabbath before in chapters 16, 20, and 23, but three additional issues are provided at this point. The first is that “above all” the Sabbath is to be kept during the construction of the tabernacle. The verses immediately preceding identified the artisans responsible for the construction, so here the LORD commands that there will be rest on the Sabbath. Second, these verses reveal that the Sabbath is a sign of the covenant and that its observance would result in increased knowledge of the LORD. Finally, for the first time a penalty is identified for failure to observe the Sabbath. That penalty was death.

We too are to rest on the Sabbath and engage in corporate worship and learn more on that occasion about the LORD through Bible study and worship. Fortunately the penalty of the civil law has been suspended (else our population would be greatly reduced). But the penalty highlights how serious the LORD considers faithful Sabbath observance even in our day.

For the New Testament church, the Sabbath is observed on Sunday recognizing that something equally important to creation rest has occurred: the resurrection of Jesus Christ on the first day of the week.

Also reviewed were the opening verses of Chapter 32 which detail the Israelites’ impatience with the long time Moses was spending on the mountain and their resorting to the making of a golden calf. This and the consequences of their sin will be reviewed next week.–Chuck Cain

Listen to Sabbath Commands and the Golden Calf (Exodus 31:12-32:6) at mcopc.org.

June 19, 2015

With Reverence and Awe: Returning to the Basics of Reformed Worship

With Reverence and Awe CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

Hart and Muether have produced a refreshing and informative primer on Reformed worship. Concerned with the integrity of Reformed worship in these days of the so-called “worship wars,” the authors argue for a traditional Reformed approach they see as biblically and confessionally faithful. Simply put, worship must not be disconnected from its theological foundation. Responding to the trend of less formal, relaxed, and more user-friendly worship formats, the authors remind us that Christian public worship ought to reflect the antithesis between the church and the world. While worship should be intelligible, it should not be confused with evangelistic outreach and therefore ought not to lose its “alien” nature and heavenly focus. Hart and Muether discuss two key Reformed principles of worship, the “regulative” and the “dialogical.” While you might not agree with everything the authors say, you will wrestle with essential issues of Reformed worship. – Jeff Waddington – Westminster Bookstore Staff

Source: WTS Books

About the Author

John Muether

Reformed Theological Seminary Faculty Page

John R. Muether (MAR, Westminster Theological Seminary) is librarian and associate professor of church history at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando. The coauthor of four volumes, Muether has served on the Harvard Divinity School library staff and has been librarian at Western Theological Seminary and Westminster Theological Seminary. He has served on the editorial board of Regeneration Quarterly and on the board of directors of Mars Hill Audio. He is historian of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and serves on that denomination’s Christian Education Committee.

darryl g hart

The Philadelphia Society

D. G. Hart studied American history at the Johns Hopkins University and has served as director of the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College and academic dean and professor of church history at Westminster Seminary in California. He is currently visiting assistant professor of history at Hillsdale College.

Source: P&R Publishing

Library patrons who have read this book are invited to share their comments, reviews, questions or criticisms for discussion in the comments below this post.