Archive for ‘Scripture’

April 3, 2016

Inspiration and Authority of the Bible

Inspiration and Authority CoverStatus: Checked Out 

Book Description

If the Bible is written by fallible human beings, how can its words convey divine revelation? Perhaps the greatest challenge of Warfield’s lifetime was the modernist skepticism of biblical inspiration and authority. Modern biblical scholars showed that textual and linguistic analysis proved the human authorship of the Bible, and from there proceeded to strip miracles of their power, texts of their authenticity, and God of his historical intervention in the lives of individuals. Warfield responded to modernist and higher biblical critics by showing that intellect of the biblical authors not only remained fully operational and engaged, but that God also worked through human words and texts to convey divine revelation.

B. B. Warfield’s volume on divine revelation and biblical inspiration defined the parameters of the twentieth century understanding of biblical infallibility, inerrancy, and the trustworthiness and authority of Scripture. He pioneered a view of biblical inspiration and authority which remains widely held today by many Reformed and evangelical Christians. Revelation and Inspiration contains ten of Warfield’s most influential articles on the subject, as well as two appendices—one on the divine origin of the Bible and the other on the canonicity of the New Testament.

Source: Monergism.com

BB Warfield

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851-1921)

About the Author

Pastor, biblical scholar, and eminent theologian, Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield was born near Lexington, Kentucky in 1851. He studied at the College of New Jersey and afterwards enrolled as a student at Princeton Theological Seminary. He completed his seminary degree in 1876, and afterwards spent two additional years of study abroad under leading European theological tutors. After returning to America, Warfield served as pastor at First Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, Maryland (1877-78). In 1878 he accepted a call to serve as a Professor of New Testament at Western Theological Seminary in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where he remained for the next nine years.

Following the sudden and premature death of A. A. Hodge in 1887, Warfield accepted the call to Princeton and began a distinguished teaching and publishing career that would conclude with his death in 1921. Warfield was a competent linguist and gifted exegete; his studies in textual transmission and the related field of biblical criticism provided a strong scriptural foundation for his work as Professor of Polemic and Didactic Theology at Princeton. Warfield’s individual mastery of theological encyclopedia represents the highpoint in the history of the gifted faculty who helped establish Princeton’s reputation for profound scholarship and eminent piety.

Warfield devoted his life to meticulous research, learned and pious publications, and caring for his invalid wife, Annie Pierce Kinkead, who he had married in 1876. She had suffered severe nervous trauma when they had been caught in a violent thunderstorm while walking in the Harz mountains in Germany not long after their marriage. Warfield’s domestic responsibilities limited his involvement in denominational activities and travels beyond Princeton. His time spent in study, however, paid rich dividends of lasting value for the Christian church through the steady stream of articles, reviews, lectures, collections of sermons, and monographs that flowed from his pen. Several of his books are published by the Trust: Counterfeit Miracles, Faith and Life, Biblical Doctrines, The Saviour of the World, and Studies in Theology.

Warfield sought to perform his work at Princeton as a continuation of the spirit and theological contours of Charles Hodge’s legacy. As editor of The Princeton Review for over twenty years, he helped re-establish the journal as a major presence in the world of theological academia. As a theologian, Warfield’s efforts were often drawn to an apologetic defence of the reliability of the Scriptures and the intellectual truth claims of biblical doctrine. Scientific naturalism, theological liberalism, and the effects of autonomous human reason were all brought under the searchlight of Scripture and exposed for the different species of unbelief that they each were. Warfield’s evidentialist approach to biblical apologetics places emphasis on the facts of divine revelation and the ability of the human mind to interpret the data in a way that should lead to responsive faith, but never at the expense of omitting the need for the work of the Holy Spirit in illumination and regeneration for the data to be properly interpreted and Christ embraced with genuine saving faith.

[Based upon James Garretson’s short memoir of Warfield in Princeton and the Work of the Christian Ministry, Volume 2.]

Source: Banner of Truth Trust

Book Details

446 Pages
Publisher: P&R Publishing Company
Publication Date: 1948
ISBN 10: 087552527X
ISBN 13: 9780875525273

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February 1, 2016

The Battle Belongs to the Lord:The Power of Scripture for Defending Our Faith

Battle Belongs to the Lord CoverStatus: Available

Publisher’s Description

Apologetics is not just for philosophers. We all need wisdom for defending our faith. This book equips us to answer unbelief by means of our most powerful weapon.

Hoping “to get us to open our Bibles again when we think about apologetics,” K. Scott Oliphint probes six Scripture texts on the subject. He summarizes their message as follows:

Since Christ is Lord, and the battle is his, we are always ready to contend for the faith once for all delivered to the saints.

We are to use the weapons, not of this world, but of the Lord.

We are to take every thought captive to the obedience of Christ as we demolish the arguments, with gentleness and reverence, of those who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, exchanging the truth of God for a lie, worshipping created things, rather than the Creator.

Includes study questions for each chapter.

Oliphint K Scott

Dr. K. Scott Oliphint

About the Author

 

K. Scott Oliphint is Professor of Apologetics at Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia. He is the leading authority on Van Tillian Apologetics. He is author of Reasons for Faith: Philosophyin the Service of Theology, The Consistency of Van Til’s Methodology,Cornelius Van Til and the Reformation of Christian Apologetics; coauthorof Christian Apologetics Past and Present: A Primary Source Reader, If I Should Die Before I Wake: Help for Those Who Hope for Heaven, Things That Cannot Be Shaken: Holding Fast to Your Faith in a Relativistic World, and editor of Justified in Christ: God’s Plan for Us in Justification, and The Defense of the Faith, 4th Edition.

208 Pages

Publisher: P&R Publishing Company
Publication Date: December 2003

ISBN 10: 087552561X
ISBN 13: 9780875525617

Source: WTS Books

January 5, 2016

Thy Word is Still Truth: Essential Writings on the Doctrine of Scripture from the Reformation to Today

Thy Word is Still Truth CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

This new collection of Reformed thinkers’ writings from the Reformation to today brings together key documents on the inerrancy of Scripture in one readable volume.

One of the hallmarks of Westminster Theological Seminary since its beginning in 1929 has been a high view of Scripture that reflects the historic Reformed theological and confessional tradition. Thy Word Is Still Truth confirms that Westminster still holds this high view.

The book’s title builds on the important influence of E. J. Young’s classic book on inerrancy, Thy Word Is Truth. This current anthology unapologetically borrows that title, emphasizing an abiding commitment to the entire truthfulness of the Holy Scriptures as well as a deep indebtedness to Reformed thinkers from the past to the present.

In addition to including all the major confessions and catechisms, Thy Word Is Still Truth includes seminal articles on the doctrine of Scripture from the following authors:

Oswald T. Allis, William Ames, Herman Bavinck, Louis Berkhof, Henry Bullinger, John Calvin, Edmund P. Clowney, William Cunningham, Raymond B. Dillard, Jonathan Edwards, Sinclair B. Ferguson, John M. Frame, Richard B. Gaffin Jr., Louis Gaussen, Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg, Archibald Alexander Hodge, Charles Hodge, John Knox, Peter A. Lillback, Martin Luther, J. Gresham Machen, Adolphe Monod, John Murray, John Owen, Vern S. Poythress, Moisés Silva, Charles H. Spurgeon, Ned B. Stonehouse, Francis Turretin, Zacharias Ursinus, Cornelius Van Til, Geerhardus Vos, Bruce K. Waltke, Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, Robert Dick Wilson, John Witherspoon, Edward J. Young, and Ulrich Zwingli

About the Editors

Peter LillbackPeter A. Lillback (BA, Cedarville College; ThM, Dallas Theological Seminary; PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is Professor of Historical Theology and President at Westminster Theological Seminary. He is the author of many books and articles, including the best-selling George Washington’s Sacred Fire.

Richard GaffinRichard B. Gaffin Jr (BA, Calvin College; BD, ThM, and ThD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is Professor Emeritus of Biblical and Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. He is also the author of Resurrection and Redemption: A Study in Paul’s Soteriology.

Hardcover, 1,392

Publisher: P&R Publishing
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 9781596384477

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November 25, 2015

God Transcendent

God Transcendent CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

J. Gresham Machen ‘was one of the most colourful and controversial figures of his time, and it is doubtful that in the ecclesiastical world of the twenties and thirties any religious leader was more constantly in the limelight’. Machen was a scholar, Professor at Princeton and Westminster Seminaries, church leader, apologist for biblical Christianity, and one of the most eloquent defenders of the faith in the twentieth century.

God Transcendent is a collection of Machen’s addresses. It shows, perhaps more clearly than any of his books, why he was such a great man. In these messages, Machen expounds the greatness and glory of God, the wonder and power of the gospel and the exhilaration of serving Christ in the front line of spiritual warfare.They show why Machen fought so tenaciously for biblical truth against error: ‘It is impossible to be a true soldier of Jesus Christ and not fight’.

This series of popular messages includes Machen’s famous address, “The Active Obedience of Christ,” delivered only weeks before his death on January 1, 1937.

Table of Contents:

Introduction
1. God Transcendent
2. Isaiah’s Scorn of Idolatry
3. The Fear of God
4. Sin’s Wages and God’s Gift
5. The Issue in the Church
6. The Letter and the Spirit
7. The Brotherhood in Christ
8. The Claims of Love
9. The Living Saviour
10. Justified by Faith
11. The Gospel and Modern Substitutes
12. The Separateness of the Church
13. Prophets False and True
14. The Good Fight of Faith
15. Constraining Love
16. The Creeds and Doctrinal Advance
17. Christ Our Redeemer
18. The Doctrine of the Atonement
19. The Active Obedience of Christ
20. The Bible and the Cross

J Gresham Machen

J. Gresham Machen (1881-1937)

About the Author

John Gresham Machen was born at Baltimore on July 28, 1881, the middle of three sons born to a southern lawyer, Arthur Machen, whose brother had fought for the Confederates in the Civil War. Some time in his youth Machen came to a personal faith in Christ, but there was no dramatic conversion experience. In later years he was not even able to recall the date (4 January 1896) when he had publicly professed faith and become a church member in Franklin Street Presbyterian Church. He was educated at Johns Hopkins and Princeton Universities, Princeton Theological Seminary and the Universities of Marburg and Göttingen in Germany.

Machen taught at Princeton Seminary from 1906 until its reorganisation in 1929. Then he left to help found Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, where he served as professor of New Testament until his death from pneumonia on New Year’s Day, 1937. In 1936 Machen was instrumental with others in founding what became the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, and was its first Moderator.

[See also Ned B. Stonehouse, J. Gresham Machen: A Biographical Memoir (Banner of Truth, 1987); Geoffrey Thomas, ‘J. Gresham Machen’, The Banner of Truth, No. 214 (July 1981), pp. 12-20 and Nos. 233-238 (February-July 1983) .]

Source: Banner of Truth Trust

Paperback, 206 pages

Publisher: Banner of Truth Trust

Publication Date(s):

1949 (Wm. B. Eerdman’s Edition)
1982 (First Banner of Truth Edition)
2002 (Banner of Truth Edition Reprinted)

ISBN: 0-85151-355-7

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October 19, 2015

The Bible and Homosexual Practice: Texts and Hermeneutics

Bible and Homosexual Practice CoverStatus: Checked Out

Book Description

Gagnon offers the most thorough analysis to date of the biblical texts relating to homosexuality. He demonstrates why attempts to classify the Bible’s rejection of same-sex intercourse as irrelevant for our contemporary context fail to do justice to the biblical texts and to current scientific data. Gagnon’s book powerfully challenges attempts to identify love and inclusivity with affirmation of homosexual practice.

. . . the most sophisticated and convincing examination of the biblical data for our time. –Jürgen Becker, Professor of New Testament, Christian-Albrechts University

Dr. Robert A. J. Gagnon, Associate Professor of New Testament, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

Dr. Robert A. J. Gagnon, Associate Professor of New Testament, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

About the Author

Robert A. J. Gagnon is Associate Professor of New Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. He co-edits Horizons in Biblical Theology, and has published in the Journal of Biblical Literature, Novum Testamentum, and Catholic Biblical Quarterly.

Book Details

522 Pages
Publisher: Abingdon Press
Publication Date: September 2002
ISBN 10: 0687022797
ISBN 13: 9780687022793

Source: WTS Books

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June 29, 2015

The Transmission of the Tradition (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

P1000083

Dr. Daniel B. Wallace (Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts) rubs elbows with Pastor Joseph L. Troutman.

On Sunday, June 14, 2015, Pastor Joe Troutman preached on the transmission of the apostolic tradition from 2 Thessalonians 2:13-15.

The Lord used spoken and written means to transmit his word that man might know him and know how to be saved.

1. Many Things Jesus Did—There was a tremendous amount of information about the words and works of the Lord Jesus Christ. The apostle John wrote his gospel after the fall of Jerusalem. Paul wrote his letters without the four gospels or the rest of the New Testament to consult. John included material in his gospel which adds to that which is found in the earlier synoptic gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke and the rest of the New Testament (See John 20:30-31). Paul had to learn about Jesus from the other apostles and directly from the Lord (cf. 1 Corinthians 11:23).

2. Hold To the Traditions—In addition to his letters, Paul also engaged in oral tradition. Paul writes to calm the Thessalonians’s fears regarding the return of Christ. Paul refers to the gospel as the traditions which have been believed by us. The traditions of the Roman Catholic Church differ from those to which Paul refers, and so are “traditions of men” (Colossians 2:8).

3. By Spoken Word or Letter—In the first century AD, the gospel was transmitted to the church by both spoken word and by letter. Many things about Jesus were written, and many others were only transmitted orally. These oral traditions were certainly passed on to the second and third centuries. One such story is called “The Pericope of the Adulteress” (or, pericope adulterae; hereafter “PA”) which is found in John 7:53-8:11. Notable Christian scholars such as F.F. Bruce, Bruce Metzger and Daniel Wallace believe the events in this passage actually happened. The Codex Bezae, which dates to the 5th century contains the pericope of the adulteress. Kyle Hughes reports that this pericope may be traced as far back as AD 50. Unbelieving scholars, such as Bart Ehrman, use the PA to argue against the reliability of the New Testament, and his recent books have persuaded many to disbelieve the Bible. What you don’t know about the transmission of the text of the New Testament is being exploited by unbelieving scholars like Ehrman to destroy the faith of the common believer.

Oral tradition is generally considered unreliable, yet true events in 2 Thessalonians were transmitted orally. Skeptical scholars doubt its reliability, and they err on the side of late dates for New Testament writings, and discard them as inauthentic. Appeals to the telephone game are often made to undermine the value of oral transmission, but this is a case of modern understanding being imposed on ancient people. Ken Bailey, in “Informal Controlled Oral Tradition in the Gospels” demonstrates that ancient traditions are transmitted with a high degree of accuracy, and so Western views of ancient Eastern traditions are inaccurate.

If the PA is not original to the gospel of John, then how did it get there? It was told and retold by the apostles between AD 50 through the 70s. The pericope features many similarities to the vocabulary of Luke in his gospel and his book of the Acts of the Apostles. It may be that Luke influenced the wording of this unique passage. Its textual pedigree includes a citation by Papias in his Didaskalia, the Codex Bezae and 900 New Testament manuscripts. These have been the means by which this oral tradition was transmitted to us from the apostolic era. No doubt, God orchestrated the transmission of this passage and its inclusion in the New Testament canon.

Simply put, the pericope of the adulteress in John 7:53-8:11 is just another story of Jesus showing compassion toward a repentant sinner, and his convicting hypocrites for their rejection of him. Be thankful for the means of God’s transmission of the gospel.

Listen to The Transmission of the Tradition (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15) at mcopc.org.

For further reading

Where is the Story of the Woman Caught in Adultery really from? (by Daniel B. Wallace)
Informal Controlled Oral Tradition in the Gospels (by Kenneth Bailey)

June 22, 2015

God, Adam, and You: Biblical Creation Defended and Applied

God Adam and You CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

What difference does Adam make? The answer, to many Christians today, is “not much.”

Adam, we are told, is a mythological figure who can safely be abandoned without compromising the authority and infallibility of Scripture. After all, is holding on to a historical Adam more important than downplaying Genesis 1-3 enough to mediate the gospel to our secular culture?

The Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology joins with historic Christianity in saying that yes, it is. Adam is not only necessary to our Christian faith and witness, but he makes a world of difference to our understanding of God, mankind, the Bible—and even the gospel itself.

The following contributors examine what the truth of Adam means about the truth of Scripture as a whole, how he shows us what it means to bear God’s image, and what an understanding of Adam teaches us about Christ.

Derek W. H. Thomas—The Bible’s First Word
Joel R. Beeke—The Case for Adam
Kevin DeYoung—Two Views of the Human Person
Liam Goligher—Adam, Lord of the Garden
Richard D. Phillips—The Bible and Evolution
Richard D. Phillips—God’s Design for Gender, Marriage and Sex
Derek W. H. Thomas—Differing Views on the Days of Creation
Joel R. Beeke—Christ, the Second Adam
Richard D. Phillips—From God’s Garden to God’s City
Carl R. Trueman—Original Sin and Modern Theology

Learn what difference the historical Adam makes to us today, as followers of the second Adam, the Lord Jesus Christ.

Dr. Richard D. Phillips

Dr. Richard D. Phillips

About the Author

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church of Greenville, South Carolina. He is a council member of The Gospel Coalition, chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology, and coeditor of the Reformed Expository Commentary series.

Book Details

Publication Date: 2015
Publisher: P&R Publishing
Pages: 212

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June 12, 2015

Thy Word is Truth: Some Thoughts on the Biblical Doctrine of Inspiration

Status: Available

Thy Word is Still Truth CoverBook Description

Since its first publication in the USA in 1957, Thy Word is Truth has been recognized as the classic popular exposition of the biblical doctrine of inspiration. There are several reasons for the wide and warm acclaim which has been accorded to the author, the late Professor Edward J. Young, of Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia.

Thy Word is Truth explains the importance of the doctrine of biblical inspiration. Without it the reliability of the Bible is in serious doubt, the integrity of Jesus is put in question, and the only final authority men have in matters of faith becomes their own conscience. If we cannot trust what Scripture says about itself, how can we trust what it says about God, about man’s need, or about Christ’s saving power?

Furthermore, Thy Word is Truth explains why this doctrine has been so fiercely contested. It is precisely because it lies at the heart of Christianity. While it is said that only what we think of Christ really matters, Professor Young urges us to recognize that what we think of him inevitably depends on the reliability of the Bible. If it fails us, we can know nothing for certain about Christ. He has chosen to make himself known through Scripture.

To write such a book as this demands special gifts, and a rare combination of qualifications. E.J. Young possessed these to an unusual degree. He was an outstanding linguist and biblical scholar, and knew the text of the Bible intimately. He understood the doctrinal issues which are at stake. He possessed a lucid mind and pen. He was also willing to rest his own soul on the convictions to which Scripture itself drove him-even when this involved swimming against the tide of the world of scholarship in which he moved with high distinction. His blend of true scholarship with humble commitment to Christ makes this study a reliable introduction to a question which continues to haunt the church at the beginning of the 21st century.

EJ YoungAbout the Author

Edward Joseph Young (1907-1968) was Professor of Old Testament at Westminster Theological Seminary from 1936 until his death. He also edited the Westminster Theological Journal.

He had an early interest in languages – having felt a call to the ministry when he was only fifteen and a student at Lowell High School in San Francisco, he thereupon started to study Greek. Following his graduation from Stanford University in 1929 (A.B.), he spent a year in Palestine where he taught school in Bethlehem and studied Syriac with a priest of the Syrian Church. During this same year, he crossed the Sinai desert with another American guided by two Arabs. The trip took a month and was made by camel. His second year abroad was spent travelling through Europe, learning more and more languages, seeing the places where Paul preached, studying in Germany and Spain, cycling through England.

After receiving the Stevenson Fellowship upon graduation from Westminster Seminary in 1935 (Th.B., Th.M.), he married Lillian Riggs Borden and made the trip to Leipzig, Germany, a honeymoon as well as an opportunity to study under outstanding scholars. He was an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA) from 1935-36 and then in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church from 1936. In 1943 he obtained his Ph.D. degree in Semitic languages from Dropsie College, Philadelphia.

Language with Young was more than a routine study; it was a work of love. He had a speaking or reading knowledge of at least twenty-six languages, and most of these were self-taught. He could pursue studies in Ugaritic, speak German fluently, and preach in Spanish. He reported that he could find a use for every one of his languages in his Old Testament studies. F. F. Bruce said of him, ‘Young speedily established a reputation for himself as the most outstanding Old Testament scholar in America belonging to the older conservative school. His standard of orthodoxy was high, as was his standard of scholarship. He commanded the respect of many scholars who disagreed totally with his theological position, both because of his learning and because of his courtesy. His own beliefs on critical problems were firmly held and faithfully proclaimed, but he did not misrepresent the beliefs of others. He could always be counted upon to state them fairly and not to indulge in denunciation of those with whom he differed.’

E. J. Young’s principal works include The Prophecy of Daniel (1949), An Introduction to the Old Testament (1949), Arabic for Beginners (1949), My Servants the Prophets (1952), Studies in Isaiah (1954), Thy Word is Truth (1957) and The Study of Old Testament Theology Today (1958). He died suddenly from a heart attack in February 1968. John Murray, a former colleague at Westminster, said of him: ‘Edward J. Young adorned his Christian profession. So many were the virtues making up this adornment that it is difficult to single out any for special appreciation. But his humility was so conspicuous that no one could fail to mark it. For those who knew him more intimately his circumspect consistency was no less evident. Unassuming and reluctant to make his own voice heard he was always ready to speak out when the honour of Christ and the claims of truth demanded it. He burned with holy jealousy for the integrity of God’s Word and for the maintenance of the whole counsel of God.’

Source: Banner of Truth Trust

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June 8, 2015

The Sufficiency of Scripture

The Sufficiency of Scripture CoverStatus: Available

Publisher’s Description

Even though Scripture is the cornerstone of the Christian faith, there is much confusion on the doctrine of Scripture. This has led to its inspiration and authority becoming an area of debate. Here, in this new and comprehensive study, Dr. Weeks brings his multi-disciplinary learning to bear on the question of the sufficiency of Scripture.

The author believes that the debate about the Bible has shifted its centre of gravity in recent years. The older distinctions between fundamentalist and modernist, evangelical and liberal, have become obsolete as more subtle distinctions have emerged. In view of this, The Sufficiency of Scripture deals with such diverse issues as revelation, translation, creation, prophecy, and the role of women in the church. Dr. Weeks provides careful analysis of the biblical teaching in these areas, giving ‘depth criticism’ of much of the superficial and false thinking expressed in some contemporary discussions of these questions.

The Sufficiency of Scripture combines unusually wide learning with radical criticism. Thorough in its approach, instructive in its handling of material, it is deeply provocative and provides a unique contribution to the modern debate on the Bible. Noel Weeks’ contentions cannot be ignored by Christians who take seriously their commitment to the Bible as the Word of God.

About the Author

Noel K. Weeks, born at Grafton, Australia, earned a B.Sc. (Honours) in Zoology from the University of New England, Armidale (Australia), a B.D. and Th.M. from Westminster Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. (Mediterranean Studies, dealing with some of the Nuzi texts) from Brandeis University, Massachusetts.

He retired in 2012 as a Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Sydney, but remains an Associate in their Department of Classics and Ancient History, with an interest in the Ancient Near East, specializing in Mesopotamia and Israel, and the Akkadian Language.

A member of the Reformed Churches of Australia, Noel Weeks is sought after as a speaker and writer on many issues. He has served as President of the association for the largest parent-controlled Christian School in New South Wales and as Chairman of the Middle East Reformed Fellowship Australia.

Book Details
312 Pages
Publisher: Banner of Truth
Publication Date: May 1988

Source: WTS Books

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