March 20, 2015

June Spotlight! The Christ of the Covenants

Status: Available

AChrist of the Covenants Coverbout
What is a covenant? Asking for a definition of “covenant” is like asking for a definition of “mother.” A mother may be defined as the person who brought you into the world. That definition may be correct formally. But who would be satisfied with such a definition?

Scripture clearly testifies to the significance of the divine covenants. God has entered repeatedly into covenantal relationships with particular men. Explicit references may be found to a divine covenant established with Noah, Abraham, Israel, and David. Israel’s prophets anticipated the coming of the days of the “new covenant,” and Christ himself spoke of the last supper in covenantal language.

But what is a covenant?

Robertson leaves no stone unturned as he explains the Bible’s covenants. As he explores each covenant in depth, he helps us to see their unity, diversity, and place in the history of redemption. (HT: Presbyterian & Reformed Publishing)

O Palmer Robertson

O. Palmer Robertson

The Author
O. Palmer Robertson (ThM, ThD, Union Theological Seminary, Virginia) is director and principal of African Bible College, Uganda. He previously taught at Reformed, Westminster, Covenant, and Knox Seminaries. Read more about Dr. Robertson at African Bible College.

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February 4, 2018

The Origin of Paul’s Religion

Cover Origin of Paul's ReligionBook Description

The Origin of Paul’s Religion (1921) is perhaps Machen’s best known scholarly work. This book was a successful attempt at critiquing the Modernist belief that Paul’s religion was based mainly upon Greek philosophy and was entirely different from the religion of Jesus.

Machen writes a masterful and forthright defense of the historical truthfulness and supernaturalism of the New Testament. This volume is taken from the James Sprunt Lectures delivered at Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. Reprints of this book sometimes add the subtitle “The Classic Defense of Supernatural Christianity”.

Machen refutes the anti-supernaturalism that was beginning to dominate the church in the early decades of the twentieth century. Although written 85 years ago it remains a model of biblical scholarship and warm piety.

Source: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

J Gresham MachenAbout the Author

John Gresham Machen, (born July 28, 1881, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.—died January 1, 1937, Bismarck, North Dakota), was born to a prominent family in Baltimore. Machen studied at Johns Hopkins University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the universities at Marburg and Göttingen. In 1906 he joined the faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary. He criticized liberal Protestantism as unbiblical and unhistorical in his Christianity and Liberalism (1923), What is Faith? (1925) and struggled to preserve the conservative character of the Princeton Theological Seminary. Machen defended the historical reliability of the Bible in such works as The Origin of Paul’s Religion (1921) and The Virgin Birth of Christ (1930). He left Princeton in 1929, after the school was reorganized and adopted a more accepting attitude toward liberal Protestantism, and he helped found Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. His continued opposition during the 1930s to liberalism in his denomination’s foreign missions agencies led to the creation of a new organization, The Independent Board for Presbyterian Foreign Missions (1933). The trial, conviction and suspension from the ministry of Independent Board members, including Machen, in 1935 and 1936 provided the rationale for the formation in 1936 of the Presbyterian Church in America, which became the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC) in 1939. Machen was the principal figure in the founding of the OPC if for no other reason than that the Presbyterian controversy in which he played a crucial role provided the backdrop for the denomination.

Sources: Britannica, and OPC.org

329 Pages
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.
Publication Date: 1925; Third Reprint 1976
ISBN: 080281123X

 

 

 

January 19, 2018

The Virgin Birth of Christ

Cover Virgin Birth of ChristBook Description

In the spring of 1927, Dr. J. Gresham Machen delivered the Thomas Smyth Lectures at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia, about the virgin birth of Christ. The content of these lectures comprise the substance of his book, The Virgin Birth of Christ, which was first published in 1930 by Harper & Row Publishers, and reprinted seven times with special permission between 1965 and 1980 by Baker Book House. Additional supplementary material was also drawn from a number of Machen’s articles published in the Princeton Theological Review—”The Virgin Birth in the Second Century,” “The Hymns of the First Chapter of Luke,” and “The Origin of the First Two Chapters of Luke,” which appeared in 1912, and “The Integrity of the Lucan Narrative of the Annunciation,” which appeared in 1927.

The first eleven chapters attempt to demonstrate that the virgin birth of Christ is a historical fact, and defends the character of the birth narratives in Matthew 1 and Luke 2 as authentic and reliable witnesses thereto. In chapters twelve through fourteen, he interacts with the competing claim that the idea of the virgin birth of Christ was derived from Jewish or pagan sources and only later added to the Christian creed.

In his second preface, Dr. Machen expresses encouragement by many affirming interactions with critical Protestant scholars who valued his work, despite their disagreement, as at least a useful “compendium of information.” “The author is encouraged by such recognition, since he believes that truth is furthered by full and open debate” (page vii). This work exemplifies a depth in Evangelical scholarship which is so often dismissed by skeptical and critical scholars, and Dr. Machen “makes bold to think that the scholarly tradition of the Protestant Church is not altogether dead even in our day, and he looks for a glorious revival of it when the narrowness of our metallic age (of modernist liberalism) gives place to a new Renaissance” (page x).

J Gresham Machen

Dr. J. Gresham Machen (1881-1937)

About the Author

John Gresham Machen, (born July 28, 1881, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.—died January 1, 1937, Bismarck, North Dakota), was born to a prominent family in Baltimore. Machen studied at Johns Hopkins University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the universities at Marburg and Göttingen. In 1906 he joined the faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary. He criticized liberal Protestantism as unbiblical and unhistorical in his Christianity and Liberalism (1923), What is Faith? (1925) and struggled to preserve the conservative character of the Princeton Theological Seminary. Machen defended the historical reliability of the Bible in such works as The Origin of Paul’s Religion (1921) and The Virgin Birth of Christ (1930). He left Princeton in 1929, after the school was reorganized and adopted a more accepting attitude toward liberal Protestantism, and he helped found Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. His continued opposition during the 1930’s to liberalism in his denomination’s foreign missions agencies led to the creation of a new organization, The Independent Board for Presbyterian Foreign Missions (1933). The trial, conviction and suspension from the ministry of Independent Board members, including Machen, in 1935 and 1936 provided the rationale for the formation in 1936 of the Presbyterian Church in America, which became the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC) in 1939. Machen was the principal figure in the founding of the OPC if for no other reason than that the Presbyterian controversy in which he played a crucial role provided the backdrop for the founding of the denomination.

Sources: Britannica, and OPC.org

415 pages
Publisher: Baker Book House; distributed by Westminster Discount Book Service
Publication Date: 1930; Seventh Reprint, 1980
ISBN: 0801058856

January 4, 2018

Calvinism and Evangelical Arminianism

Cover Calvinism and Evangelical ArminianismBook Description

Since the Remonstrants first defended the teachings of Jacob Arminius at the Synod of Dordt, the system known as Arminianism has undergone a number of expressions by its various advocates. In the nineteenth century, it had become apparent to Dr. John L. Girardeau that the form of Arminianism preached by American Evangelical Arminians as influenced by the preaching of John Wesley had not been sufficiently critiqued and answered in print, along with a corresponding defense of the doctrines of Calvinism.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first part, the doctrines of election and reprobation are stated and proven, and two categories of Arminian objections are answered: appeals to the moral attributes of God, such as his divine justice, goodness, wisdom and veracity, and appeals to the moral agency of man.

The second part is divided into four sections, in which Dr. Girardeau states the Calvinistic doctrine of justification and explains the ground, nature and condition of this essential of Protestant theology and contrasts it with the Arminian alternative.

John L Girardeau

Dr. John L. Girardeau   (1825-1898)

About the Author

John Lafayette Girardeau (1825-98) John Lafayette Girardeau was born as Lafayette Freer Girardeau on November 14, 1825 to John Bohun Girardeau and Claudia Herne Freer Girardeau. The parents of young Girardeau were of French Huguenot descent and, by the time of their eldest son’s birth on James Island (across the Ashley River from Charleston), possessors of a rich colonial ancestry, which included at least one Revolutionary War hero. John Bohun (a planter) and Claudia Freer were also solid Presbyterians of the Scottish type. The Holy Scriptures and Westminster Standards were the standard fare for the Girardeau children with both father and mother active in their religious upbringing.

Also important in Girardeau’s formative years were two notable pastors, Aaron W. Leland and Thomas Smyth. Leland was the wee lad’s pastor on James Island and Smyth nurtured him during his early adolescent years in Charleston. Although Leland was of English ancestry, he was of the Scottish persuasion when it came to his theology and ecclesiology. Smyth was of Scotch-Irish background and pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Charleston. The low country Presbyterians had from the first identified with Scotland rather than the Mid-Atlantic Presbyterians. This was no doubt true because of Archibald Stobo, the pioneering Scot who founded the earliest distinctly Presbyterian churches in the South.

Girardeau was educated on James Island and in Charleston, completing Charleston College (now College of Charleston) in 1844 at the age of seventeen. He graduated with first honors (valedictorian) as a Greek and Latin scholar. Upon his graduation, Professor William Hawksworth exclaimed to those around him, “There goes a fine Greek scholar to make a poor Presbyterian preacher.”

After a year of tutoring and teaching on James Island and Mt. Pleasant (to raise money), he matriculated at the Theological Seminary of the Synod of South Carolina and Georgia (later Columbia Theological Seminary). As a ministerial student at Columbia he studied under his childhood pastor, Aaron W. Leland, and the venerable George Howe. Girardeau supplemented his seminary education by regularly attending the pulpit ministrations of Benjamin Morgan Palmer at the Presbyterian Church (now First Presbyterian), a short walk from both the seminary and South Carolina College. The seminarian also placed himself under the tutelage of James Henley Thornwell at the College (now University of South Carolina). Thornwell was at the time Professor of Moral Philosophy and preached or lectured regularly in the college chapel (Rutledge Chapel). Girardeau and other seminary students attended Dr. Thornwell’s addresses assiduously. Indeed, Girardeau attributed Dr. Thornwell’s chapel addresses with giving “shape and form” to his theology, which was already stoutly Westminsterian.

As a child of Claudia Herne Girardeau, the scion of South Carolina had learned to respect the poor and needy of society. During the latter years of college he had held regular meetings for the slaves on his father’s plantation, exhorting them to believe the gospel and rest upon Christ for their deliverance from sin. In seminary he held evangelistic meetings in a warehouse where the poor, enslaved, derelict, and disreputable attended. Shortly after graduation from seminary in 1848 he was ordained to the ministry of word and sacrament and embarked upon a brief series of pastorates-Wappetaw Church and Wilton Presbyterian Church-that would culminate in Charleston as a famous pastor to slaves.

In January 1854, he and his wife Penelope Sarah (“Sal”) moved from St. John Parish and Wilton Presbyterian Church (January 1849-December 53) to Charleston to assume the work begun by John B. Adger and the session of Second Presbyterian Church. The work was designed to establish a church for and of the slaves. In 1850, citizens of Charleston built a meeting house on Anson Street for the exclusive use of the slaves. After Adger’s health failed, Girardeau was handpicked by Adger and Smyth to lead the work forward. The work expanded from thirty-six black members when Girardeau arrived to over 600 at the time of the American Armageddon. He preached to over 1,500 weekly from 1859 through 1861.

In 1858/59 the Anson Street Mission experienced a marvelous revival and in April 1859 they moved into a new building at the prestigious and prime intersection of Meeting and Calhoun Streets. The black membership was given the privilege of naming their church (which was particularized in 1858) and they chose “Zion.” Zion Presbyterian Church became famous for Girardeau’s preaching-he was called “the Spurgeon of America”-, but it was also noteworthy for its diaconal ministry in the community, catechetical training of hundreds in the city, sewing clubs for the women, and missionary activity. The outreach and influence of Zion was of such public notoriety that Girardeau and the session were often criticized and sometimes physically threatened. For example, the catechetical training and teaching of hymns and psalms was so effective that some Charlestonians believed Girardeau was teaching the slaves to read for themselves (which was contrary to state law).

After the War and before Girardeau could return to Charleston, a number of freedmen of Zion Presbyterian Church beckoned Girardeau to return to “the Holy City” and resume his work with them. They desired to have their white pastor whom they knew, loved, and respected, rather than a black missionary from the North. Throughout the post-War and Reconstruction years, he arduously worked amongst both black and white in Charleston. He mightily labored within the Southern Presbyterian Church to see that the freedmen were included in the church and in 1869 he nominated seven freedmen for the office of ruling elder in Zion Presbyterian Church, preached the ordination service, and with the white members of his session laid hands on his black brothers.

Unfortunately, the pressures of Reconstruction and the Freedmen’s Bureau, and the hardened positions of notables like B. M. Palmer and R. L. Dabney brought the church to a pivotal moment. The weight of political and social issues eventuated in “organic separation” of white membership and black membership and the formation of churches along the color line. Girardeau alone dissented against the resolution at the 1874 General Assembly in Columbus, Mississippi, for which he served as Moderator.

In 1875, B. M. Palmer nominated Girardeau for Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology at Columbia Seminary, a position W. S. Plumer had held since 1866. In January 1876 he began his seminary labors which lasted until June 1895. During his academic career he continued as a popular preacher in the Southern Church, defended biblical orthodoxy against the inroads of modernism in the Woodrow Controversy at Columbia Seminary, labored actively against union with the Northern Presbyterian Church, served the courts of the church tirelessly, contributed many theological, ecclesiological, and philosophical articles to academic journals, and wrote several important monographs on theology, worship, and philosophy. He made significant contributions to the doctrine of adoption and the diaconate.

Girardeau and his beloved wife “Sal” had ten children who crowned their forty-nine years of marriage. Seven Girardeau children lived to adulthood while three died in infancy. Three Girardeau daughters married Presbyterian ministers, including the notable theologian and churchman Robert Alexander Webb. This pastor to slaves and theologian of the Southern Church died quietly at his home in Columbia on June 23, 1898, just a few months after his friend R. L. Dabney had passed away. B. M. Palmer wrote of Girardeau that “It will be long before another generation can produce his equal; and those, who have known him from the first to last, feel that we lay him to rest among the immortals of the past.” His body rests just a few short steps from his mentor and friend James Henley Thornwell in Columbia’s Elmwood Cemetery.

Source: PCA Historical Center

574 Pages
Publisher: Sprinkle Publications

December 3, 2017

Martin Luther’s Christmas Book

Martin Luthers Christmas Book CoverBook Description

This inspiring collection contains thirty excerpts from Martin Luther’s Christmas sermons. In his unique and powerful voice, Luther portrays the human reality of God’s birth on earth—Mary’s distress at giving birth with no midwife or water, Joseph’s misgivings, the Wise Men’s perplexity, Herod’s cunning. And throughout these sermon-meditations, Martin Luther reminds us that keeping Christmas is a year-round mission of caring for those in need.

Nine elegant illustrations by Luther’s contemporaries—including four by noted engraver Albrecht Durer—capture timeless scenes from the Christmas story. And two of Luther’s beautiful Christmas carols are included on the final pages of the book.

roland-h-bainton

Roland H. Bainton

About the Editor

Renowned Reformation scholar Roland H. Bainton wrote the introduction, as well as translating and arranging this collection of Luther’s sermons. Bainton was a professor of church history at Yale Divinity School and the author of numerous books, including Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther.

72 Pages
Publisher: W.L. Jenkins. Reproduced by permission of The Westminster Press
Publication Date: 1948
ISBN: 978-0-8066-3577-4

November 1, 2017

Martin Luther: The Man and His Work (The Reformation Trail Series #19)

Martin Luther Man And His Work CoverBook Description

“Luther’s marriage raised a great hue and cry. the union of a renegade monk with an escaped nun, violating as it did their own personal vows, and ecclesiastical and civil law as well, seemed to many to throw a sinister light upon the whole reform movement. Now, they declared, the significance of the Reformation was revealed to all the world, and it was clear what Luther had had in mind from the beginning. Satirical attacks appeared in great numbers. Slanderous tales were spread about him and his bride. Even many of his friends were thrown into consternation, and feared he had dealt a death-blow to the cause. The lawyer Jerome Schurf, when he heard the rumour that Luther was contemplating marriage, remarked: “If this monk takes a wife, the whole world and the devil himself will laugh, and all the work he has accomplished will come to nothing.” Others, though wishing to see him married, regretted he had chosen Kathe rather than some woman of wealth and position. The time, too, seemed to almost everybody particularly inopportune. His prince and supporter, the Elector Frederick, had died only a month before, and all Saxony was still mourning him, as Luther was, too, for that matter. Moreover, the peasants’ war was not yet ended, and the whole country was in an uproar.”

About the Author

Arthur Cushman McGiffert

Arthur Cushman McGiffert (1861-1933)

Arthur Cushman McGiffert (March 4, 1861 – 1933), American theologian, was born in Sauquoit, New York, the son of a Presbyterian clergyman of Scots-Irish descent.

He graduated at Western Reserve College in 1882 and at Union Theological Seminary in 1885, studied in Germany (especially under Harnack) in 1885-1887, and in Italy and France in 1888, and in that year received the degree of doctor of philosophy at Marburg. He was instructor (1888-1890) and professor (1890-1893) of church history at Lane Theological Seminary, and in 1893 became Washburn professor of church history in Union theological seminary, succeeding Philip Schaff. He became the 8th president of Union Seminary in 1917.

His published work, except occasional critical studies in philosophy, dealt with church history and the history of dogma. His best known publication is a History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age (1897). This book, which sustains critical historical eminence to this day, by its independent criticism and departures from traditionalism, aroused the opposition of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church; though the charges brought against McGiffert were dismissed by the Presbytery of New York, to which they had been referred, a trial for heresy seemed inevitable, and McGiffert, in 1900, retired from the Presbyterian ministry and retained his credentialed status by eager recognition from a Congregational Church. Likewise he retained his distinguished position at Union Theological Seminary.

A History of Christian Thought constituted a two volume work (1932, 1933) which established an American standard in theological studies and is still cited regularly by scholars. Among his other publications are: A Dialogue between a Christian and a Jew (1888); a translation (with introduction and notes) of Eusebius’s Church History (1890; part of Philip Schaff’s Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers series); and The Apostle’s Creed (1902), in which he attempted to prove that the old Roman creed was formulated as a protest against the dualism of Marcion and his denial of the reality of Jesus’s life on earth.

Source: Wikipedia

460 pages
Paperback
Inheritance Publications
Publication Date: 1911, 2017
ISBN: 9781772980189

September 1, 2017

Reformation Sketches

Reformation Sketches Cover“The sketches in this book strive to show that the Reformation remains vitally important for Christians today,” writes W. Robert Godfrey. “Reformers and preachers of the sixteenth century were the best educated, godliest, and most faithful group of leaders the church has ever seen. In a remarkable way they combined commitment, learning, and orthodoxy. We need to continue to learn from them.”

In Reformation Sketches, Martin Luther and John Calvin receive most of Godfrey’s attention, but he also treats Philip Melanchthon, Peter Martyr Vermigli, the Heidelberg Catechism, and the Canons of Dort.

“A wonderfully written history of the Great Reformation. With the care of a scholar and the insights of professional maturity, Godfrey takes us on a journey into our heritage.”—John D. Hannah

“Godfrey is a wise and engaging historian of the Reformation. His sketches provide a compelling introduction to the Reformers, showing the relevance of their lives and thought for Christians today.”—Philip Graham Ryken

“Edifying history at its best—a thorough grasp of cultural and political circumstances influencing the church, a keen understanding of the doctrinal issues at stake, and a deep concern for the ongoing reformation of the contemporary church.”—Darryl G. Hart

About the Author

W. Robert Godfrey

Dr. W. Robert Godfrey

W. Robert Godfrey (Ph.D., Stanford University) is professor of church history and president at Westminster Theological Seminary in California (retired), and a Teaching Fellow with Ligonier Ministries. He is the author of John Calvin: Pilgrim and Pastor, and most recently, Learning to Love the Psalms

Binding: Paperback
Pages: 151
Publisher: P&R Publishing
Publication Date: 2003
ISBN: 0875525784

August 14, 2017

The Bondage of the Will

Bondage of the Will CoverThe Bondage of the Will is fundamental to an understanding of the primary doctrines of the Reformation. In these pages, Luther gives extensive treatment to what he saw as the heart of the gospel.

Free will was no academic question to Luther: the whole gospel of the grace of God, he believed, was bound up with it and stood or fell according to the way one understood it. Luther affirms our total inability to save ourselves and the sovereignty of divine grace in our salvation. He upholds the doctrine of justification by faith and defends predestination as determined by the foreknowledge of God.

This accurate translation by J. I. Packer and O. R. Johnston captures the vitality of Luther’s treatise, thereby conveying its relevance to our lives today. The translators write, “Do we not stand in urgent need of such teaching as Luther here gives us – teaching which humbles man, strengthens faith, and glorifies God?”

About the Author

Martin Luther

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

Martin Luther, O.S.A., was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. (Read more at his Wikipedia entry)

322 Pages
Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 0800753429

July 5, 2017

God’s Glory Alone (The 5 Solas Series)

Gods Glory Alone CoverStatus: Available

Book Description

Historians and theologians have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations (or “solas”) that distinguished the movement from other expressions of the Christian faith.

Five hundred years later, we live in a different time with fresh challenges to our faith. yet these rallying cries of the Reformation continue to speak to us, addressing a wide range of contemporary issues. The Five Solas series will help you understand the historical and biblical context of the five solas and how to live out the relevance of Reformation theology today.

In God’s Glory Alone—The Majestic Heart of Christian Faith and Life, David VanDrunen examines how the doctrine of God’s glory developed in Reformed theology and confessions. Then, he turns to the biblical story, beginning with the pillar of cloud and fire revealed to Israel, and culminating in Christ’s Second Coming. VanDrunen concludes by looking at today’s cultural challenges—such as distraction and narcissism—reflecting on how commitment to God’s glory alone fortifies us to live godly lives in this present evil age.

David VanDrunenAbout the Author

David VanDrunen (JD, Northwestern University School of Law; PhD, Loyola University Chicago) is Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics at Westminster Seminary California. He is the author of Living in God’s Two Kingdoms: A Biblical Vision for Christianity and Culture and Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: A Study in the Development of Reformed Social Thought.

Matthew Barrett (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminar) is tutor of Doctrine and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, executive editor of Credo Magazine, and the author and editor of several books, including the 5 Solas Series.

186 pages
Publisher: Zondervan
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 978-0-310-51580-7

June 8, 2017

Luther in Love

Status: Checked Out

Luther in Love CoverBook Description

Discovering that love and marriage are complex sacrificial and yet intensely beautiful, Katharina von Bora, fearful of discovery, secretly pens a memoir of her apostasy, her forbidden marriage to Martin Luther, his dangerous life and turbulent legacy, their trials and tragedies, and their joys and triumphs.

Douglas Bond

Douglas Bond

About the Author

Douglas Bond, husband of Cheryl and father of six, is author of more than twenty-five books, a hymn-writer, and an award-winning teacher. He speaks at churches, schools and conferences, directs the Oxford Creative Writing Master Class, and leads church history tours, including tours of Luther’s Germany. www.BondBooks.net

Book Details

337 pages
Publication Date: 2017
Publisher: Ink Blots Press
ISBN: 978-1-945062-02-5

April 18, 2017

Dispatches from the Front | Episode 2: A Bold Advance (Albania, Kosovo & Montenegro)

A Bold Advance CoverStatus: Available

DVD Description

A Bold Advance is set in the rugged regions of Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro among people deeply wounded by war and brutal dictatorships. Yet here in this scarred land are those who have been changed inside-out by the power of Christ. Their faces and stories declare that the message of the Cross crushes all barriers—even those raised by mosques and minefields. Hike the mountain trails with pioneer men and women who are reaching the hard-to-reach people and loving them into the Kingdom. From Albania’s lawless frontier to Montenegro’s “Mountains of the Damned” to the killing fields of Kosovo, Dispatches from the Front: A Bold Advance is another Macedonian call to action and a reminder that the Gospel still shakes the gates of Hell.

Source: Frontline Missions International

Tim Keesee

Tim Keesee, filmmaker and host of Dispatches from the Front

About Frontline Missions International

Radical Rescue Work

The cross is central in the Frontline logo, but more importantly it is at the heart of our message and mission. We believe in the centrality and finality of Christ’s work on the cross – of His radical rescue work for all of us. Knowing its life-giving power, we desire that all people hear this Good News. Many have heard it often, but many more have never heard it even once. So we focus on those with the least opportunity to hear, going to them with urgency, joy, and confidence because we have been sent by our King.

Bibles & Gospel Literature

Bible smuggling was our earliest passion, and it is still a great privilege to put the Bible into people’s hands for the first time in places like the Horn of Africa and Central Asia. In addition, Frontline Missions has published commentaries, devotionals, and Christian classics such as Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Tozer’s The Pursuit of God in Russian, Arabic, Uzbec, Croation, Polish, Mandarin, and Turkish.

Advocacy for Persecuted Christians

FMI is dedicated to being a voice for persecuted believers in other countries, along with our ongoing efforts to take the Gospel into restricted access countries. Many of these persecuted believers are on the frontlines, witnessing for Christ in areas that are hostile to the Gospel. They are shining as lights in very dark areas of the world that are dominated by hostile religions and totalitarian regimes. You can partner with Frontline by staying informed through our regular Persecution Updates and by appealing to members of Congress and the U.S. State Department to put pressure on foreign governments to stop persecuting believers and to honor the most basic of human rights: freedom of religion. You can also write directly to officials of foreign governments to make such appeals.

Mercy Ministries

The Gospel is a specific message about a specific Person – the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. However, the Gospel message is adorned by acts of mercy. As we have received grace, we share it with others. Frontline Missions shares both the message and the mercy of the Gospel by providing assistance to refugees, orphans, and people with special needs.

Church Planting

In parts of the world where there is the least Light, “church” rarely means a building with a steeple. Instead, “church” is gatherings of believers meeting in an apartment or a mud hut, or even under a mango tree. We are committed to planting vibrant, Word-centered churches – not Western-style transplants, but churches that will take root in native soil. Whether this is done by Chinese, Arabs, Uzbeks, or Americans, Frontline is supporting and serving indigenous church planting movements.

Creative Access

In most countries hostile to the Gospel, it is not possible to get a “missionary” visa – but it is possible for believers to go in and stay in those countries if they bring needed skills with them. Through teaching, community development, medicine, business, and horticulture, Frontline Missions is developing platforms for work and witness in the world’s difficult places.

Training Leaders

William Carey, Hudson Taylor, and other missionary trailblazers led the way in crossing continents and cultures with the Gospel. People of every nation, tongue, and tribe came to Christ, churches sprang up, and they – in turn – began sharing the Gospel with their own people. Today there is a whole new, diverse missionary force that Christ has raised up from among many peoples. Frontline Missions is coming alongside this next generation of indigenous church leaders as they take the Gospel to their people – providing training, connecting them with a network of other regional leaders, and equipping them with tools for Bible study and exposition.

Dispatches From The Front

This documentary series has been called “a front row seat on the front lines.” The Dispatches from the Front DVD series is about opening windows to Christ’s Kingdom all over the world. These episodes are not scripted, staged, or re-created. The writing and filming unfold in the moment – moments that reveal the unstoppable power of the Gospel in every place.

Frontline Experience

The Frontline Experience (FX) is a training and orientation program that serves the Church and advances the Gospel by equipping men and women to serve Christ in hard-to-reach places.

Source: FrontlineMissions.info/About

DVD Details

Running Time: Approximately 54 minutes
Widescreen
Copyright 2010, Frontline Missions International